Parsnip Mash

By: Cassy Joy Garcia

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This delicious, creamy parsnip mash is incredibly easy to make and puts a fun spin on the traditional starchy side!

a bowl of mashed parsnips garnished with parsley and a pat of butter

What is parsnip mash?

Parsnip mash is exactly what it sounds like — parsnips that have been cooked to tender, then mashed with a few key, creamy ingredients. It’s essentially the parsnip equivalent to mashed potatoes, and it is so, so good!

What do parsnips taste like?

Though they look really similar to a carrot, parsnips don’t actually taste a whole lot like carrots. Parsnips are nutty, earthy, and slightly sweet, but their flavor is neutral enough to be used in a lot of different ways.

Are parsnips better for you than potatoes?

Because both parsnips and potatoes have something to bring to the table nutritionally, it really isn’t a matter of better or worse — they’re just different! If you’re following a lower-carb diet, parsnips may be a good potato swap for you — they contain about 12 grams of carbohydrates per half-cup versus the 20 grams in a regular white potato. Parsnips are also loaded with vitamins C, A, K, and fiber!

Pureed Parsnip Ingredients

The ingredient list is short, and I’d be willing to bet that you have several of the items listed in your kitchen already! Here’s what you’ll need:

all of the ingredients for mashed parsnips in different sized bowls and plates on a marble surface
  • Parsnips – to start, you’ll need about 1 pound of peeled and chopped parsnips.
  • Butter – to add a delicious richness to the mash, you’ll need 2 tablespoons of salted butter.
  • Sour Cream – nothing has quite the same power to make things as decadent and creamy as sour cream! You’ll need a ½ cup here.
  • Salt, Pepper, and Garlic Powder – to simply season the parsnip mash, you’ll need a ½ teaspoon of sea salt, a ¼ teaspoon of cracked black pepper, and a ¼ teaspoon of granulated garlic.
  • Fresh Parsley – garnish with chopped fresh parsley for a pop of color and a delicious, herby flavor.

Supplies Needed to Make this Recipe

How to Make a Parsnip Puree

  1. Boil the parsnips – bring a medium-sized pot of water to a boil on the stovetop, add the chopped parsnips, and boil them for about 20 minutes, until they’re fork-tender. Then, drain the water from the pot.
  2. Add the butter, sour cream, salt, pepper, and garlic powder – to the pot with the drained, softened parsnips, add the butter, sour cream, salt, pepper, and garlic powder.
  3. Mash the parsnips – use an immersion blender to blend the parsnip mash. If you don’t have an immersion blender, use a food processor or mash the parsnip manually using a potato masher.
  4. Serve and enjoy!
chopped parsnips in a stainless pot filled with water
all of the ingredients for mashed parsnips in a stainless pot
chopped parsnips in a stainless pot
a stainless pot of mashed parsnips

Should parsnips be peeled before cooking for parsnip mash?

That’s totally up to you, actually. I prefer to peel my parsnips (for reference, I also peel carrots, but I almost never peel potatoes), but a lot of folks feel comfortable just scrubbing them clean. I’d say that if you typically peel your carrots, go ahead and peel your parsnips, but if you prefer to pass on that extra step, go for it.

To puree parsnip, is it better to boil or roast the parsnips?

Because we want the parsnip chunks to soften and be a uniform texture for the mash, boiling them is the best way to go. While roasted parsnips are delicious and I highly recommend trying them, the crispy outside that will develop in the oven isn’t ideal for a mash.

How to store and reheat Parsnips Mash

Store your parsnip mash in an airtight container in the refrigerator and reheat either in a pot on the stovetop or in the microwave (essentially, exactly how you’d typically reheat mashed potatoes).

Can this mashed parsnip recipe be frozen?

Sure! That’s a really great idea, actually. To freeze, simply scoop the parsnip mash into an airtight container and seal. When you’re ready to enjoy the parsnip mash, simply pull it out of the freezer, let it thaw in the refrigerator, and then reheat it either in a pot on the stovetop or in the microwave.

a bowl of mashed parsnips garnished with parsley and a pat of butter

What to Serve with Parsnip Puree

ANY kind of pork is a really great option here. Pork and parsnip mash go together really, really well. Here are my favorite options:

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Parsnip Mash Recipe

This parsnip mash is easy to make and puts a fun spin on the traditional starchy side!

  • Author: Cassy Joy Garcia
  • Active Time: 10 minutes
  • Cook Time: 20 minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: Serves 4 1x
  • Category: Sides
  • Method: Stovetop
  • Cuisine: American

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 pound parsnips, peeled and chopped
  • ½ cup sour cream
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • ¼ teaspoon cracked black pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon granulated garlic
  • Fresh parsley, chopped, for garnish

Instructions

  1. Bring a medium-sized pot of water to a boil on the stovetop and add the chopped parsnips.
  2. Boil parsnips for about 20 minutes, until they’re fork tender.
  3. Drain the water from the pot, and add the sour cream, butter, salt, pepper, and garlic powder.
  4. Use an immersion blender to blend the parsnip mash. If you don’t have an immersion blender, use a food processor or mash the parsnip manually using a potato masher.
  5. Serve with pork chops and roasted apples, garnish with chopped parsley, and enjoy!

Keywords: parsnip mash

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